Hydrocele

Hydrocele

If excess fluid accumulates inside the membranes surrounding the testicles, the testicles swell and hydrocele (water hernia) is formed. This disease can be either congenital or later.

Hydrocele

Congenital Hydrocele: The testicles of the baby boy in the womb are located inside the abdomen. After the 14th week of pregnancy, it moves under the abdomen and settles in the testicle bag (scrotum). As the testicles move under the abdomen to settle into the scrotum, the peritoneum (abdominal membrane) takes the shape of a glove finger and helps the testicles reach their place. After birth, the vesicle form turns into a filamentous structure and closes. If the vesicle is not closed properly, intra-abdominal fluid passes through that opening and accumulates around the testicle, causing swelling. This swelling becomes more evident with the increase of intra-abdominal pressure and thus it can be diagnosed. This swelling, called hydrocele, is a congenital problem in the newborn, but circulatory disorders, infections and tumors can also cause hydrocele. The child hydrocele can be seen together with the hernia or separately. While surgical treatment is performed immediately in those seen with the hernia, it is generally expected to be up to 2 years old for treatment, since those who appear separately may improve spontaneously over time.

See Also: Pediatric Urology Surgery

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