Asthma

Asthma

Asthma is a serious public health problem estimated to affect approximately 300 million people worldwide. It can affect individuals of all ages. It can be controlled with the right treatment. When it cannot be taken under control, it can seriously restrict daily activities.

Asthma

The airways start from the mouth and nose and continue with the trachea. The trachea is divided into two main branches (bronchi) in the lungs, right and left, and gradually tapering into little branches, like the branches of a tree. At the end of these little branches, there are air vesicles in which oxygen coming from the air into the blood and carbon dioxide in the dirty blood passes into the air.

Asthma is a disease that manifests itself with narrowing of the airways and comes in attacks (crises). Patients feel good between attacks. There is a non-microbial inflammation in the airways in asthma. Therefore, the airway wall is swollen and edematous. This causes the lungs to be hypersensitive to stimuli. With stimuli such as dust, smoke, and odors, symptoms such as cough, shortness of breath and feeling of pressure in the chest appear immediately.

During the crisis, the muscles surrounding the airways contract, edema and swelling increase, and with the progressive inflammation, the airway wall thickens. A thick mucus (phlegm) is released from the glands in the airways. All this significantly narrows the airways, and the air is prevented from entering and leaving the lungs. This condition is manifested by increased cough, shortness of breath, wheezing.

There are symptoms such as cough (usually dry, that is, without sputum), shortness of breath, feeling of pressure in the chest, and wheezing. The symptoms are repetitive and come in seizures. It usually occurs at night or in the morning. It resolves spontaneously or with medications. Some causes may vary depending on the individual. Symptoms may vary seasonally.

The symptoms that lead the individual to the physician and the medical history of the individual constitute the first step of the diagnosis phase. The important points in the story can be summarized as follows:

  • Symptoms (cough, shortness of breath, feeling of pressure in the chest, wheezing) are repetitive
  • Feeling good except for attacks
  • Symptoms, especially at night or in the morning
  • The emergence of symptoms with individual allergens or irritants

Cough or wheezing after exercise

  • The common cold which is “coming down to the chest”
  • Symptoms improve spontaneously or with appropriate asthma treatment
  • Has a family history of asthma or allergic disease

There is no blood test that can reveal asthma. X-ray findings are generally normal. With respiratory function devices, by making breath measurements (with or without medication), the diagnosis can be confirmed or the severity of the disease can be determined.

Asthma is a serious public health problem estimated to affect approximately 300 million people worldwide. It can affect individuals of all ages. It can be controlled with the right treatment. When it cannot be taken under control, it can seriously restrict daily activities.

The airways start from the mouth and nose and continue with the trachea. The trachea is divided into two main branches (bronchi) in the lungs, right and left, and gradually tapering into little branches, like the branches of a tree. At the end of these little branches, there are air vesicles in which oxygen coming from the air into the blood and carbon dioxide in the dirty blood passes into the air.

Asthma is a disease that manifests itself with narrowing of the airways and comes in attacks (crises). Patients feel good between attacks. There is a non-microbial inflammation in the airways in asthma. Therefore, the airway wall is swollen and edematous. This causes the lungs to be hypersensitive to stimuli. With stimuli such as dust, smoke, and odors, symptoms such as cough, shortness of breath and feeling of pressure in the chest appear immediately.

During the crisis, the muscles surrounding the airways contract, edema and swelling increase, and with the progressive inflammation, the airway wall thickens. A thick mucus (phlegm) is released from the glands in the airways. All this significantly narrows the airways, and air is prevented from entering and leaving the lungs. This condition is manifested by increased cough, shortness of breath, wheezing.

There are symptoms such as cough (usually dry, that is, without sputum), shortness of breath, feeling of pressure in the chest, and wheezing. The symptoms are repetitive and come in seizures. It usually occurs at night or in the morning. It resolves spontaneously or with medications. Some causes may vary depending on the individual. Symptoms may vary seasonally.

The symptoms that lead the individual to the physician and the medical history of the individual constitute the first step of the diagnosis phase. The important points in the story can be summarized as follows:

  • Symptoms (cough, shortness of breath, feeling of pressure in the chest, wheezing) are repetitive
  • Feeling good except for attacks
  • Symptoms, especially at night or in the morning
  • The emergence of symptoms with individual allergens or irritants

Cough or wheezing after exercise

  • The common cold which is “coming down to the chest”
  • Symptoms improve spontaneously or with appropriate asthma treatment
  • Has a family history of asthma or allergic disease

There is no blood test that can reveal asthma. X-ray findings are generally normal. With respiratory function devices, by making breath measurements (with or without medication), the diagnosis can be confirmed or the severity of the disease can be determined.

Asthma is a disease that is described as swelling of the airway walls in the lungs due to some factors and narrowing of these airways. It is thought that asthma is caused by a mixture of hereditary and environmental factors.

Inside the lungs, there are airlines that consist of flexible tissues and branch like a tree. The airways are wrapped with muscle bands. These airways narrow in size as they travel through the lung.

The smallest airways at the extreme end in clusters of small balloon-like air sacs (alveoli). These clusters are surrounded by blood vessels. When you breathe, the air enters the lungs. It progresses in the airways until it reaches the air sacs.

When we exhale, air moves out of the airways and lungs. The airways produce mucus that captures particles in the breath we take. Normally, mucus is expelled from the lungs by small hairs (sillar) in the airways.

In asthma, the walls of these airways thicken, the muscles around it contract and excessive mucus production, thus making it harder for the person to breathe.

Common symptoms in asthma are frequent coughing attacks that can occur during play, at night, or while laughing. The cough may be the only symptom available or may progress with the following conditions:

  •         Shortness of breath, air hunger
  •         Whistling sound or wheezing while breathing
  •         Fast breathing during rest
  •         Complaints such as chest tightness or pain in the chest, injuries
  •         Withdrawals between the ribs during breathing
  •         Less energy during the game
  •         Feeling weak or tired

Asthma in childhood is 90% allergic origin.

The sensitivity caused by the domestic allergens in the bronchi causes asthma symptoms such as cold symptoms, exercise, respiratory tract infections, chemical odors, air pollution and cigarette smoke, resulting in contact with stimuli. In addition, overexposure to the allergic substance may also cause symptoms of cough, wheezing, and shortness of breath.

 

It should be noted that infections of the upper respiratory tract and lower respiratory tract infections can also be among the causes of asthma-like symptoms in children. Not all wheezing or coughs may be due to asthma.

Diagnosing asthma in infants and children is often difficult. However, in older children, the disease can often be diagnosed based on the child’s medical history, symptoms, and physical examination.

See Also: Asthma and Respiratory System Tips

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